The Declaration of Independence

Lexington 1776In 1774 the delegates for the Continental Congress assembled in Philadelphia. Hostilities had already broken out and the delegates, although all from the wealthier classes of society, were under pressure to adopt a more radical stand. Originally the majority of the upper class Americans did not want independence. But the mood of the masses made all thought of compromise impossible. The situation was explosive and this favored the most radical elements in Congress. As a result, on July 4, 1776, the Thirteen United States of America declared their independence from Great Britain. Originally published in the book Marxism and the USA, published by and available from Wellred.

Mightier than the sword

paine-tom.jpg If there was one man who embodied the spirit of revolutionary democracy, it was Tom Paine. He inspired the American Revolution of 1776, took part in the French Revolution of 1789 and, while abroad in France, was tried in Britain for seditious libel for writing his book 'The Rights of Man' 

The Tet Offensive: the Turning Point in the Vietnam War—Part Two

In the early hours of January 31, 1968, 70,000 North Vietnamese soldiers, together with guerrilla fighters of the NLF, launched one of the most daring military campaigns in history. The Tet Offensive was the real turning point in the Vietnam War. On its 40th anniversary, Alan Woods analyzes the events that led to the Vietnam War and the significance of the Tet Offensive in bringing about the defeat of US imperialism, and draws some parallels with Iraq.

The Tet Offensive: the Turning Point in the Vietnam War—Part One

In the early hours of January 31, 1968, 70,000 North Vietnamese soldiers, together with guerrilla fighters of the NLF, launched one of the most daring military campaigns in history. The Tet Offensive was the real turning point in the Vietnam War. On its 40th anniversary, Alan Woods analyzes the events that led to the Vietnam War and the significance of the Tet Offensive in bringing about the defeat of US imperialism, and draws some parallels with Iraq.

Shays' Rebellion

Shays' Rebellion

There is a stage in every great revolution when the masses – or at least the most militant section of the masses – begin to feel that they have been cheated of the fruits of victory, that power is slipping through their fingers and they have to act to prevent this from happening. A desperate minority moves to take power and is crushed. This marks a decisive turning point in the revolution, where the conservative wing crushes its former allies and proceeds to consolidate its power as a new ruling class. This stage in the American Revolution was Shays Rebellion.

Originally published in the book Marxism and the USA, published by and available from Wellred.